Updated patterns!

I'm in the process of updating my old patterns, particularly the bibs, to include charts. I'm rewriting some of the directions to make the patterns even easier and including alternative methods for beginning the bibs and for making the ties. Look for these patterns in the sidebar to see which ones have been added. It's a slow process, but eventually, they'll all be there!



Saturday, June 26, 2010

Micah's Frogs

First, I apologize for being away so long. Life has dealt our family a cruel blow, but we're surviving and life will go on. Needless to say, I haven't felt a lot like knitting lately, but it has bothered me that I haven't been posting as often as I'd like to.

On a happier note, my grandson, Micah, recently turned 5. As I've told you before, he just loves frogs (shudder), so I thought it would be fun to knit him some frog mittens.
This is the Frog Mitts pattern from Morehouse Farm . They had a big sale on all of their patterns, so I couldn't resist this one, plus a "few" others. They also sell kits in addition to their patterns. The only drawback on these is the two holes for the eyes. I'm not so sure how practical it is to have two holes in your mittens! Still Micah seemed to like them and he insisted on wearing them home, even though it was close to 85 degrees!
I used Cascade 220 in Palm Green. A nice froggy green!
I also knit him a pair of froggy socks. Well, at least I tried to make them. I haven't ever used intarsia on socks before and after these, I doubt that I'll ever try it again! I started out using black and green, but after starting and ripping, or should I say "frogging" it three times, I ended up just ditching the black and starting over with the navy blue. I had a hard time getting a nice smooth cuff. I had much better luck with these, or so I thought. When Micah went to put them on, we could barely get them over his heel. There is hardly any stretch to the cuff, because of the intarsia. Duh, I should have realized that! On top of that, I discovered that his feet have grown significantly since the last pair of socks I made him!! Very inconsiderate of him, don't you think?
In any event, he wanted to wear them home as well. I bet it was fun trying to get them off his feet that night. I used Cascade Heritage for the navy and some left over bits of Knit Picks Stroll in "Canopy". I love that yarn! If you think you might like the chart, I'll post it. Just click on the picture to enlarge it.
I used size 2.75 mm needles and 52 stitches which gave me a repeat of four frogs.
After all these frog projects, I realized that I should probably add a frog bib to the mix as well (not for Micah, of course). I call this bib "Hop-A-Long" and I warn you that it has NOT BEEN TESTED. This time around, I decided that you can all be my test knitters, so if any of you decide to make it, please let me know if you find any errors. If you would prefer to make a dishcloth, you just need to knit seven rows of "k1, p1" and then begin the pattern with Row 12 and end with Row 62. Eventually, I'll knit up a cloth. There isn't a pdf for this one pattern. My webspace has run out of room. My son is working on getting me set up with a website, but until that's done, I'll just have to post the patterns here. So then, without further ado, here's
"Hop-A-Long":
Copyright 2010 by Elaine Fitzpatrick. Permission is granted to make and sell items from this pattern provided that credit is given to me as the designer. Permission is not granted to reproduce the actual pattern, or post it, or distribute it, without my express permission. Please respect my copyright and play nice!
Size: approximately 8" from neck edge to bottom and 7 ½" wide

Materials: One skein of worsted weight cotton in a solid color such as Peaches & Crème or Sugar ‘n Cream if you are using the bib for meals. If, on the other hand, you want to use it as a “drool” bib, I would recommend using a superwash wool. The cotton has a tendency to absorb the moisture, whereas the superwash wool will wick the moisture and keep baby nice and dry! Sample was done in Peaches & Crème Apple Green.

Needles: US 5/3.75 mm or 6/4.0mm You want the bib to be fairly dense, so if the fabric is too loose, just drop down a needle size.

2 double pointed needles US 5/3.75 mm for the knitted I-cord ties
or
Size G crochet hook for the crocheted ties

Gauge: 4.5 sts. per inch, not critical.

PATTERN NOTES
This pattern allows you to choose between two methods of beginning the bib. One uses short rows and the other, more traditional way, requires you to cast on stitches at the beginning of the first few rows of the pattern. There are also two methods for doing the ties. One has crocheted ties and the other method uses knitted I-cords. The crocheted ties are slightly thinner. If you do make the knitted ties, you can drop down a needle size when knitting the cords. I like to run a long tail down the center of the cord to finish it off. Be sure to use a straight needle and not one with a bent tip!

Abbreviations:
k = knit
p = purl
psso: pass slipped stitch over
k2tog.= knit 2 stitches together
p2tog.=purl 2 stitches together
sts. = stitches
dec. = decrease
dpn. = double pointed needle

Short Row Version

For this method, you don’t have to wrap stitches or pick up wraps. You just work the stitches to a point and turn your work around and start knitting in the opposite direction. I’ve written out every row for you and I’ve indicated how many stitches you should have remaining at the end of each row. If you lose your count, all you have to do is check on the number of stitches you have left on your needle and you’ll be right back on track. This technique results in a nice smooth edge.

Cast on 37 stitches
Row 1: k1, p1 for 26 sts.; turn (11 sts. unworked)
Row 2: Slip 1 knitwise; k1, p1 for 17 sts.; turn (8 sts. unworked)
Row 3: Slip 1 knitwise; p1, k1 for 20 sts.; turn (8 sts. unworked)
Row 4: Slip 1 knitwise; p1, k1 for 23 sts.; turn (5 sts. unworked)
Row 5: Slip 1 knitwise; k1, p1 for 26 sts.; turn (5 sts. unworked)
Row 6: Slip 1 knitwise; k1, p1 for 28 sts.; turn (3 sts. unworked)
Row 7: Slip 1 knitwise; k1, p1 for 30 sts.; turn (3 sts. unworked)
Row 8: Slip 1 knitwise; k1, p1 for 32 sts.; turn (1 sts. unworked)
Row 9: Slip 1 knitwise; k1, p1 for 34 sts.; turn (1 sts. unworked)
Row 10: Slip 1 knitwise; k1, p1 for 35 sts.
Row 11: k1, p1 across row.
Continue with *Row 12 of pattern.

OR

Traditional Beginning

Pattern: Cast on 15 sts.

Row 1: p1, k1 across row.
Row 2: Cast on 3 sts., k1, p1 across row. (18 sts.)
Row 3: Cast on 3 sts., k1, p1 across row. (21 sts.)
Row 4: Cast on 3 sts., p1, k1 across row. (24 sts.)
Row 5: Cast on 3 sts., p1, k1 across row. (27 sts.)
Row 6: Cast on 3 sts., k1, p1 across row. (30 sts.)
Row 7: Cast on 3 sts., k1, p1 across row. (33 sts.)
Row 8: Cast on 2 sts., k1, p1 across row. (35 sts.)
Row 9: Cast on 2 sts., k1, p1 across row. (37 sts.)
Row 10: k1, p1 across row.
Row 11: k1, p1 across row.
*Row 12: (k1, p1) x2; k1; p9; k1; p3; k1; p4; k1; p3; k1; p2; k1; (p1, k1) x3.
Row 13: (k1, p1) x3; (k3, p1) x2; k4; p1; k3; p1; k10; (p1, k1) x2.
Row 14: (k1, p1) x2; k1; p9; k1; p3; k1; p4; k1; p3; k1; p4; k1; (p1, k1) x2.
Row 15: (k1, p1) x2; k5; p1; k13; p1; k7; (p1, k1) x3.
Row 16: (k1, p1) x3; k1; p3; k3; p13; k1; p5; k1; (p1, k1) x2.
Row 17: (k1, p1) x2; k6; p1; k18; p1; k3; (p1, k1) x2.
Row 18: (k1, p1) x2; k1; p3; k1; p16; k1; p6; k1; (p1, k1) x2.
Row 19: (k1, p1) x2; k7; p1; k15; p1; k5; (p1, k1) x2.
Row 20: (k1, p1) x2; k1; p5; k1; p13; k1; p7; k1; (p1, k1) x2.
Row 21: (k1, p1) x2; k8; p1; k12; p1; k7; (p1, k1) x2.
Row 22: (k1, p1) x2; k1; p6; k1; p11; k1; p8; k1; (p1, k1) x2.
Row 23: (k1, p1) x2; k9; p1; k1; p6; k3; p1; k8; (p1, k1) x2.
Row 24: (k1, p1) x2; k1; p7; k1; p2; k1; p6; k1; p9; k1; (p1, k1) x2.
Row 25: (k1, p1) x2; k9; p1; k8; p3; k8; (p1, k1) x2.
Row 26: (k1, p1) x2; k1; p6; k1; p12; k1; p7; k1; (p1, k1) x2.
Row 27: (k1, p1) x2; k8; p1; k13; p1; k6; (p1, k1) x2.
Row 28: (k1, p1) x2; k1; p4; (k1, p7) x2; k1; p6; k1; (p1, k1) x2.
Row 29: (k1, p1) x2; k7; p1; k15; p1; k5; (p1, k1) x2.
Row 30: (k1, p1) x2; k1; p4; k1; p11; k1; p3; k1; p6; k1; (p1, k1) x2.
Row 31: (k1, p1) x2; k7; p1; k15; p1; k5; (p1, k1) x2.
Row 32: (k1, p1) x2; k1; p5; k1; p14; k1; p6; k1; (p1, k1) x2.
Row 33: (k1, p1) x2; k7; p1; k14; p1; k6; (p1, k1) x2.
Row 34: (k1, p1) x2; k1; p5; k1; p13; k1; p7; k1; (p1, k1) x2.
Row 35: (k1, p1) x2; k9; p1; k11; p1; k7; (p1, k1) x2.
Row 36: (k1, p1) x2; k1; p6; k4; (p8, k1) x2; (p1, k1) x2.
Row 37: (k1, p1) x2; k9; p1; k7; p1; k4; p1; k6; (p1, k1) x2.
Row 38: (k1, p1) x2; k1; p5; k1; p4; k2; p2; k4; p9; k1; (p1, k1) x2.
Row 39: (k1, p1) x2; k9; p1; k4; p2; k1; p1; k4; p1; k6; (p1, k1) x2.
Row 40: (k1, p1) x2; k1; p5; k1; p2; k1; p1; k1; p2; k1; p4; k1; p8; k1; (p1, k1) x2.
Row 41: (k1, p1) x2; k3; p1; k5; p1; k4; p1; k2; p1; k4; p1; k6; (p1, k1) x2.
Row 42: (k1, p1) x2; k1; p6; k4; p3; k1; p2; k1; p1; k1; p8; k1; (p1, k1) x2.
Row 43: (k1, p1) x2; (k4; p1) x3; k14; (p1, k1) x2.
Row 44: (k1, p1) x2; k1; p14; k4; (p4, k1) x2; (p1, k1) x2.
Row 45: (k1, p1) x2; k4; p1; k1; p1; k22; (p1, k1) x2.
Row 46: (k1, p1) x2; k1; p20; k1; p3; k1; p2; k1; (p1, k1) x2.
Row 47: (k1, p1) x2; k2; p1; k3; p1; k1; p1; k20; (p1, k1) x2.
Row 48: (k1, p1) x2; k1; p20; k1; p1; k2; (p1, k1) x4.
Row 49: (k1, p1) x2; (k3, p1) x2; k21; (p1, k1) x2.
Row 50: (k1, p1) x2; k1; p20; k1; p1; k1; p4; k1; (p1, k1) x2.
Row 51: (k1, p1) x2; k4; p1; k2; p1; k21; (p1, k1) x2.
Row 52: (k1, p1) x2; k1; p20; k1; p2; k1; p3; k1; (p1, k1) x2.
Row 53: (k1, p1) x2; k5; p2; k22; (p1, k1) x2.
Row 54: (k1, p1) x2; k1; p27; k1; (p1, k1) x2.
Row 55: (k1, p1) x3; k25; (p1, k1) x3.
Rows 56 – 62: k1, p1 across row.
Row 63: k1, p1 for 13 sts. Slip sts. just worked onto stitch holder, bind off the next 11 stitches knitwise; work across remaining sts. in established pattern: 13 stitches each side.

NECK AND SHOULDER SHAPING – LEFT SHOULDER
Note: As you look at the bib with the right side facing, the first shoulder worked will be the left side. All the decreases are made on right side or odd numbered rows.

Row 64: (wrong side) k1, p1 across row.

Neck decreases:
Row 65: Slip 1 knitwise, k1, psso; k1, p1 across row. (12 sts.)
Row 66: k1, p1 across row.
Row 67: Slip 1 knitwise, k1, psso; p1, k1 across row. (11 sts.)
Row 68: k1, p1 across row.

Shoulder decreases:
Row 69: k1, p1 across to last 2 sts, p2tog. (10 sts.)
Row 70: p1, k1 across row.
Row 71: k1, p1 across to last 2 sts., k2tog. (9 sts.)
Row 72: k1, p1 across row.
Row 73: k1, p1 across to last 2 sts., p2tog. (8 sts.)
Row 74: p1, k1 across row.
Row 75: k1, p1 across to last 2 sts., k2tog. (7 sts.)
Row 76: k1, p1 across row.
Row 77: k1, p1 across to last 2 sts., p2tog. (6 sts.)
Row 78: p1, k1 across row.
Row 79: k1, p1 across to last 2 sts., k2tog. (5 sts.)
Row 80: k1, p1 across row.
Row 81: Slip 1 knitwise, k1, psso; k1, p2 tog. (3 sts.)

For the crocheted ties, slip your crochet hook through the three stitches and draw your yarn through. Then work a chain for about 12 - 14 inches. The crocheted ties are not as stretchy as the knitted ones, so you might want to make these slightly longer. When you reach the desired length, work back on the chain by inserting your hook in the second chain stitch nearest the end and slip stitch in each chain until you are back to the beginning. Fasten the yarn securely and weave in the ends. I have a “mini-tutorial” for making the crocheted ties on my blog. http://downcloverlaine.blogspot.com/2010/05/ties-that-bind.html

For the knitted ties, slip these 3 sts. to a dpn work an I-cord for approximately 12 inches. Fasten off and run end down through middle of I-cord. Don't worry if the
I-cords look a little wonky. A firm tug will usually straighten them out and after the bib is washed, you won't even notice! A good tutorial for making the I-cords can be found here: http://www.knittinghelp.com/videos/knitting-tips

NECK AND SHOULDER SHAPING – RIGHT SHOULDER
With wrong side facing, slip sts. from stitch holder to left needle and join yarn at neck edge. All the decreases are made on right side or odd numbered rows.

Row 64: (wrong side) k1, p1 across row.

Neck decreases:
Row 65: k1, p1 across to last 2 sts., p2tog. (12 sts.)
Row 66: p1, k1 across row.
Row 67: k1, p1 across to last 2 sts., k2tog. (11 sts.)
Row 68: k1, p1 across row.

Shoulder decreases:
Row 69: Slip 1 knitwise, k1, psso; k1, p1 across row. (10 sts.)
Row 70: k1, p1 across row.
Row 71: Slip 1 knitwise, k1, psso; p1, k1 across row. (9 sts.)
Row 72: k1, p1 across row.
Row 73: Slip 1 knitwise, k1, psso; k1, p1 across row. (8 sts.)
Row 74: k1, p1 across row.
Row 75: Slip 1 knitwise, k1, psso; p1, k1 across row. (7 sts.)
Row 76: k1, p1 across row.
Row 77: Slip 1 knitwise, k1, psso; k1, p1 across row. (6 sts.)
Row 78: k1, p1 across row.
Row 79: Slip 1 knitwise, k1, psso; p1, k1 across row. (5 sts.)
Row 80: k1, p1 across row.
Row 81: Slip 1 knitwise, k1, psso; k1; p2tog. (3 sts.)

Work tie to correspond with the one you worked for the other side.

Weave in ends.

4 comments:

Deb said...

I'm so sorry for whatever you've been going through & I pray that things will get turned around.

It's funny how sometimes when we're going through a rough patch we don't feel like knitting, but then we're drawn back to it for comfort. There are times that I think that I would've lost my mind if it weren't for knitting. One particularly difficult time, I must have have 10 or 12 projects going all at the same time. My oldest daughter was trying to straighten up the house & she discovered all the knitting that was about & she said, "Mom, are you going through some sort of mid-life crisis or what?" At the time, I probably was....over her.

Your frogs are terrific! Seriously...I need to make a baby or a child's blanket from all your designs. It would be super cute!

Maria said...

All three froggie items are fantastic - I with Michah, I love little green tree frogs

Kathy... said...

Sorry you/yours are going thru a rough time. Hope things brighten up soon.

Love the froggies! Such cute designs....all of your stuff!

susanmark said...

HI Elaine,

SO sorry you and your family are going through a hard time.

Remember GOD Loves you and He will help you through it and give you strength.

HUGS
Susan
PS Love the froggies.